compound indication pre-clinical phase 1 phase 2 phase 3
op-687 Overactive Bladder
Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
op-352 Stress Urinary Incontinence
Fecal Incontinence
compound indication phase
op-687 Overactive Bladder Phase 1
Irritable Bowel Syndrome Phase 1
op-352 Stress Urinary Incontinence Pre-Clinical
Fecal Incontinence Pre-Clinical

Overactive Bladder (OAB)

OAB is characterized by urinary urgency, which is the sudden compelling urge to urinate that is difficult to defer. This is often associated with urine leakage and having to pass urine frequently during the day and night. In the United States, one-third of adults 40...View More

Overactive Bladder (OAB)

OAB is characterized by urinary urgency, which is the sudden compelling urge to urinate that is difficult to defer. This is often associated with urine leakage and having to pass urine frequently during the day and night. In the United States, one-third of adults 40 years of age or older report symptoms of OAB.  These symptoms have a significant impact on quality of life, often leading patients to limit their activities for fear of being caught too far from a bathroom. The associated incontinence is often the trigger that moves older patients from independence to dependence and requirement for nursing care. Normal bladder function depends on relaxation of the detrusor, the bladder wall muscle, followed by voluntary contraction of this muscle when urine is being passed. This control depends on a micturition (urination) reflex which is coordinated at the level of the lower spinal cord.  In OAB, involuntary contractions of the bladder occur.  Abnormal excitation in nerves extending from the bladder to the spinal cord, and from the spinal cord to the brain, have been implicated in these unwanted contractions.  Current medicines for OAB work by promoting relaxation of the detrusor muscle, but many patients are left inadequately treated due to limited efficacy and/or intolerable side effects.  An innovative therapeutic approach that utilizes a unique mechanism of action has the potential to meaningfully improve care for these patients.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

IBS is a condition characterized by recurrent abdominal pain with disordered bowel habits. Patients report a change in the frequency and/or consistency of their stools. Therefore, IBS is classified based on the associated bowel habit into diarrhea-predominant (IBS-D), constipation predominant (IBS-C) and mixed (IBS-M) and...View More

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

IBS is a condition characterized by recurrent abdominal pain with disordered bowel habits. Patients report a change in the frequency and/or consistency of their stools. Therefore, IBS is classified based on the associated bowel habit into diarrhea-predominant (IBS-D), constipation predominant (IBS-C) and mixed (IBS-M) and affects approximately 15% of adults. It has a significant impact on quality of life and its chronic nature can impact mental health, leading to conditions such as depression and anxiety. The cause of IBS is uncertain, but there appears to be an altered state of gut motility and associated hypersensitivity.  This abnormal sensory processing from the GI tract can lead to pain and may explain the association of IBS with other chronic pain conditions.  Current treatments for IBS often depend on managing the underlying altered bowel function using drugs that increase or decrease motility within the bowel; however, pain is often left poorly controlled.  An alternative mode of therapy that addresses the abnormal GI sensation, while also impacting the diarrhea (in IBS-D and IBS-M) or constipation (in IBS-C and IBS-M) is needed for these patients.

Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI)

Urinary incontinence is the involuntary leakage of urine which can have a debilitating impact on physical, emotional, and social quality of life.  There are different types of incontinence, distinguished by their associated symptoms and underlying mechanisms.  Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is incontinence on effort or...View More

Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI)

Urinary incontinence is the involuntary leakage of urine which can have a debilitating impact on physical, emotional, and social quality of life.  There are different types of incontinence, distinguished by their associated symptoms and underlying mechanisms.  Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is incontinence on effort or exertion, or on sneezing or coughing. Normally, the urethral sphincter withstands the increased bladder pressure that occurs when it is compressed as a result of increased intra-abdominal pressure caused by these activities.  In SUI, however, there is impaired sphincter function, which results in leakage. This predominantly affects women, in many of whom it can be attributed to damage that occurs during childbirth.  It is estimated that 1 in 3 women will suffer from SUI during their lifetime. Principal treatment options for SUI currently include pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) and surgery.  PFMT involves multiple training sessions each day over a period of several months leading to low compliance and limited overall effectiveness.  Surgery, while effective, is typically reserved for more severe cases resulting in relatively few patients benefiting from this treatment modality.  An effective pharmacologic therapy could revolutionize care for women suffering from SUI.

Fecal Incontinence (FI)

Fecal incontinence is the complaint of involuntary loss of bowel contents. This can range from occasional leakage of a small quantity of stool (feces) while passing gas to a complete loss of bowel control. Nearly 10% of people are affected by fecal incontinence, but this prevalence increases...View More

Fecal Incontinence (FI)

Fecal incontinence is the complaint of involuntary loss of bowel contents. This can range from occasional leakage of a small quantity of stool (feces) while passing gas to a complete loss of bowel control. Nearly 10% of people are affected by fecal incontinence, but this prevalence increases considerably with age, with approximately 20% of people over the age of 65 being affected and 50% of those in long-term care facilities. Those who suffer from FI often experience considerable embarrassment, which in turn can lead to social insecurity, isolation, and a diminished quality of life. The ability to hold stool (called continence) requires the rectum, anus and nervous system to be working normally. This allows stool to be stored in the rectum, and for defecation to occur at a time and in a place that is socially convenient.  Two groups of muscles, the external and internal anal sphincter, in the wall of the anus and rectum are responsible for holding the stool and avoiding leakage. In addition, the rectum needs to sense the presence of stool and remain in a relaxed state until voluntary defecation occurs.  Most treatments for FI are targeted at improving the strength of the anal sphincter or enhancing voluntary control over rectal contraction via non-pharmacologic methods such as physiotherapy and behavioral modification and treating associated diarrhea or constipation.  A novel pharmacologic approach would offer an important new treatment option for the many patients for whom current treatments are ineffective or too invasive.